I like Twitter now..?

So last night I interacted in my first Twitter chat and I was so surprised that I enjoyed it. The one thing that really bothers me about tweeting (and really the whole point of it) is the little words you can use. I like Facebook and I like browsing other WordPress accounts because I enjoy reading to learn new things. Twitter seems to be tailored around random posts that don’t really correspond with each other. However, I did notice a change in that during the #lrnchat last night, which was super fun and I actually did learn about social media outlets I’ve never heard of before. It kind of hit me that you actually are able to have conversations via Twitter. Anyways, the #lrnchat was super fun and I definitely recommend checking it out!

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Google+ is paving the way for better technology

“Google+ is already at an advantage. Facebook trail-blazed the way brands and users interacted online, and, like all innovators, had to break a few eggs to make the omelette. Facebook was never intended to be a brand platform and make the inefficient and annoying way commercial concerns used the Group function for so long confirms that, online, Rome wasn’t built in a day. If Google+ can learn from its predecessor’s mistakes, it’s already one nil up,” (pg.90.)

In chapter 10 of Share This, Google+ is the main focus, and I must say, I’m pretty impressed. I think the quote above is a great one because it’s kind of stating that not all the time is it best to be the first, but to take time to see the mistakes that have been made to make a better final product.

Google+ is especially great for PR professionals to connect with their audiences because of the grouping and categorizing users are able to do with followers. This way, organizations can communicate and interact a certain way that they may not with another group to gain more attention.

Google+ has definitely got my vote as one of the best new social media outlets that I’ve heard of. I haven’t yet created an account because I only heard what it was all about today, but I will sign up soon for sure. I think it’s awesome that you can categorize your friends from your colleagues and from there you can group specific type of friends and a specific type of colleagues; the possibilities are endless.  I also think it’s great that you are able to chat with up to 10 people at a time which makes for ideal business phone meetings. Google+ is the future and just like Facebook paved the way, Google+ will be paving the way for many other social media outlets to come.

“With the major chunk of the search market, it’s almost inevitable that the search opportunities for Google+ brands should outweigh other networks,”(pg.90.)

These 2 sources are from technology trade magazines:

This is a great article on Google+ describing how it’s better than Twitter and Facebook. It basically says that Twitter and Facebook are for a generic audience and doesn’t fit to quite everyone. Google+ help you communicate with the only the people you want to communicate with.

http://www.expand2web.com/blog/how-google-plus-is-different/

This article lists all the things about Google+ that are more beneficial to your personal life and your professional life, rather than having a Facebook.

http://www.pcworld.com/article/234825/sss.html

social.medial-comparison1

Buzzfeed is like crack

 

First of all, I want to apologize to both of you in advance for all of my shares on Facebook from Buzzfeed. I have recently become obsessed with this popular website (and now an app, that I’m so excited to have) because of a funny FB post that it originally stemmed from on my news feed. If you haven’t checked it out and need a good laugh, I highly encourage it! Basically what it is is sort of like a “gossip” column, but not in the girly, stereotypical way at all. It’s mostly all relevant news and they update it every half hour or so; I’m so impressed with the staff and writers at Buzzfeed to keep things interesting and fun. They also collect stories from other sources, which in that case they put the original link on their page. One thing that I think Buzzfeed does amazingly well is to personalize their entire website that most humans can relate to, or at least acknowledge. In our class text, Share This, the CEO of Zappos, Tony Hsieh, is quoted, “People relate to people, not companies,”(pg.18.) I think he is totally right! Buzzfeed puts up some pretty off-the-wall stories up about how awkward/ funny humans are that a lot of people won’t even talk about, but they’ll definitely get a kick out of when they read it.

Check out some of these links and let me know what you think!

http://www.buzzfeed.com/awesomer/photos-you-really-need-to-look-at-to-understand

http://www.buzzfeed.com/video/sararubin/the-most-awkward-halloween-photos-of-all-time

http://www.buzzfeed.com/lyapalater/the-terrifying-reality-of-having-shia-labeouf-stare-you-down

Image

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First of all, I want to apologize to both of you in advance for all of my shares on Facebook from Buzzfeed. I have recently become obsessed with this popular website (and now an app, that I’m so excited to have) because of a funny FB post that it originally stemmed from on my news feed. If you haven’t checked it out and need a good laugh, I highly encourage it! Basically what it is is sort of like a “gossip” column, but not in the girly, stereotypical way at all. It’s mostly all relevant news and they update it every half hour or so; I’m so impressed with the staff and writers at Buzzfeed to keep things interesting and fun. They also collect stories from other sources, which in that case they put the original link on their page. One thing that I think Buzzfeed does amazingly well is to personalize their entire website that most humans can relate to, or at least acknowledge. In our class text, Share This, the CEO of Zappos, Tony Hsieh, is quoted, “People relate to people, not companies,”(pg.18.) I think he is totally right! Buzzfeed puts up some pretty off-the-wall stories up about how awkward/ funny humans are that a lot of people won’t even talk about, but they’ll definitely get a kick out of when they read it.

Check out some of these links and let me know what you think!

http://www.buzzfeed.com/awesomer/photos-you-really-need-to-look-at-to-understand

http://www.buzzfeed.com/video/sararubin/the-most-awkward-halloween-photos-of-all-time

http://www.buzzfeed.com/lyapalater/the-terrifying-reality-of-having-shia-labeouf-stare-you-down

Allow me to introduce… Magisto!

Allow me to introduce…

magisto-android-2.3-600x318

Magisto is my new favorite app when it comes to getting creative with my pictures and videos. I got this about 3 months ago and can’t stop using it. To sum it up, you can create unique and one of a kind videos using your camera roll on your phone or computer that includes a “theme” along with a song from either Magisto’s playlist that’s provided or your very own playlist. Magisto is available online at http://www.magisto.com/ or on an Android or iPhone. I find this app and website useful for creating video clips of some of my fondest memories that I can send to my family, friends, or just keep to myself. You are able to keep your Magisto videos “private” or “public” and also to sort them into different albums based on what you title them. Magisto is not a free app, besides for the first free video you’re able to create (you’ll get addicted and want to pay for the premium membership, that’s what happened to me.) A monthly premium membership goes at a rate of $4.99, which means you can have up to 25 videos totaling up to 25 minutes and 20 photos, at 2.5 minutes each. A yearly membership goes at a rate of $17.99, which means you can have an unlimited number of videos at 2.5 minutes each. This app and website is super fun and easy and although it does cost money, I think it’s totally worth it! What a great way to save memories!:)

Here is a recent video I made from my summer in California: http://www.magisto.com/video/MQ4cPAgGFCwoW0JhCzE

Pros:

  • Easy and super fun
  • They email you when your video is finished
  • Makes great “gifts for friends or family
  • Able to share to Facebook, Instagram, and Google+
  • Between the theme, song, and the title you give the video, it’s very personalized

Cons:

  • $$
  • Takes 5-10 minutes to load (I know that’s not very long, but it seems like an eternity.)
  • Occasionally it cuts pictures off
  • No certain order of videos and pictures
  • Can’t go back and edit it; once you hit “Make My Movie!” it’s final

Want to make a fun video of the getaway you just went on? Here are the Steps:

Step 1: Click the Magisto app and Press “create”

Step 2: Select “Choose from camera roll”

Step 3: Pick up to two and a half minutes of clips and pictures

Step 4: Choose the theme

Step 5: Choose the song whether on your phone, on you tube or from Magisto’s playlist

Step 6: Add a title if you wish and then click “Make My Movie!”

…Takes up to 5-10 minutes to load video. You will then receive an email that your movie is done.

Enjoy!:)

The increase in social media outlets, the increase in guidelines

I found chapter 5 of Share This; the social media book for PR professionals to be especially interesting regarding specific guidelines that employees handling social media accounts for large companies need to endure. Social media guidelines is defined as, “a set of principles created by an organization to help employees understand the boundaries and desired do and don’ts when engaging with social media,” (pg.39.) Remember, every company is different, therefore, they have different guidelines.

Example of good communication with audiences through social media

Example of good communication with audiences through social media


The importance of guidelines
When a company creates a set of guidelines regarding social media, it sets boundaries for the employee that runs the accounts. It can help them know what to write and what not to write, which helps shield their brand from a negative image. Creating guidelines can also help employees engage in conversations with audiences.

“Too often organizations think about social media policies as a list of restrictions. But having clear guidelines can also help employees understand ways they can use social media to help achieve business goals,”(pg.40.)

In this chapter, the author expresses areas that most, if not every, organization should consider when creating guidelines:
1. Employees and expectations you have for them
2. Professionalism
3. Appropriate detail when necessary
4. Make aware of the social media accounts that DO need approval
5. Every department should have their say about the policies and guidelines
6. Clearly indicate when guidelines are put into use or updated
7. Provide training to employees
8. Go into detail about who has what job for each social media account
9. Mention and be clear about legal issues
10. Outline repercussions of violations
11. Revise and update guidelines regularly

Things to do:
Think before you post
Add a “views are my own” disclaimer where appropriate
Correct errors openly and in a timely manner
Be respectful
Check privacy settings
Disclose relationships and connections
Regularly check for updates to your organization’s social media guidelines

Things to stay away from:
Make an audience feel uncomfortable
Bring your organization into disrepute
Reveal company/ client-sensitive information or intellectual property
Be fake

Statistics
“8% of companies in the United States have fired an employee for a social media flub, while another 20% have disciplined an employee for social media misbehavior,” (pg.40.)
“…24% of companies have policies for how employees should use social networking sites like Facebook, Twitter, and LinkedIn, “(pg.40.)

Below are two examples of social media guidelines for Starbucks and Nike
http://www.starbucks.com/assets/f945dbfa51904618982409e9c09c58b6.pdf
https://nikebenefits.ehr.com/ESS/files/pdf/1-employment_policies_and_guidelines.pdf

It’s not a myth, connections are everything in PR

Networking

Before I chose PR as my major, I was hating school and studying social work. When I knew it was time to move on from social work I sat down with my mom and went, “Mom, help me choose a major.” She answered with, “Laura, I think PR would really be a great for you.” She would’ve said real estate if it was a major; I don’t think I’ve gone a day without getting a text or phone call without her saying she wants me to follow in her foot- steps of realty. PR and realty are very similar in some aspects because all I ever hear is, “having connections are everything.” I always knew that building relationships with clients in my future is important, but I never knew how important until now. You don’t need to wait for your career to start in order to build professional relationships, start NOW.

I recently had two internships over the summer in California; one in marketing and one in PR. I was blown away at how many numbers I flew back home with for people in the PR field. Just by starting up a light conversation with someone else can lead to talk about your future in public relations. I was also surprised at how helpful people were; even if that particular person I was talking to wasn’t the PR, they would try their hardest to think of someone they knew and set me up with them. For example, I recently got a position at a hotel downtown Ann Arbor as a front desk clerk, so I’m constantly being forced to talk to every single person that walks up to the front desk and who calls the hotel, which is probably over a 100 each shift. The other day I answered the phone and this woman was making a reservation for the end of October and as I was filling in her information I noticed that it was a Laguna Beach zip code, which is where I spent the summer and also where I want to move back to when I graduate. I told her my story and we went into a 15 minute phone conversation about how she is a VP at a PR agency in Laguna Beach. She asked for my name, number, and email, and said she’d love to meet with me when she comes into town. We recently just connected on LinkedIn. I would advise EVERY PR student to get a LinkedIn! My manager overheard the whole conversation and later said that 90% of employees that work here have left for a job because of the connections they make with guests at the hotel. It was a huge eye-opener that you can truly already make professional relationships if you make the effort to. People are more than willing to help, you just have to be open and connect. Although it’s so important to use social media for relationships, I think building them in person if possible is equally as important.

Here are two great quotes from two articles about building networking:

“A generic networking request for a job is worse than no request at all, because you can lose that networking contact and opportunity.”

http://www.helpguide.org/life/job_networking_how_to_find_job.htm

“The more you procrastinate, the more you will find yourself disconnected from the opportunities that may potentially advance your career or allow you to meet the right people. “

http://www.forbes.com/sites/glennllopis/2012/05/29/7-reasons-networking-can-be-a-professional-development-boot-camp/

This quote from our Social Media book is true for social media outlets and in person: “No matter the demographic, device, or even the numbers, human beings are motivated to connect and share for a multitude of reasons: researching, finding information and inspiration, participating, connecting with friends and for entertainment”, (pg.5.)

Writing for PR is the same as dating

Something that I thought was kind of interesting that writing for PR is like dating. Public Relations Writing and Media Techniques by Dennis L. Wilcox and Bryan H. Reber, discuss “How dating advice can make you a better writer” with these six points: 1. Avoid too much information, 2. Don’t talk about relationships gone bad, 3. Be Yourself, 4. Dress for the occasion, 5. Keep drinks to a minimum, and 6. Order the steak. I thought these points, in a sort of funny way, were point on with writing for PR. You would never want to make yourself look bad on a date, same with a PR campaign.

My thoughts on PRSA defends the candidate of “public relations”

The article, PRSA defends the candidate definitions of “public relations”, was an interesting one. When I think of how I would define the term “public relations”, a number of words pop up in my head. That being said, that is why this article was written; we have not come to a conclusion on a definition of the profession in which everyone agrees on in he last112 years. There are four reasons why:

 The first reason from the PRSA, “You hate them.” People usually have something negative to say about the modernized definitions PRSA has come up with, with responses like- they don’t, you did, you can, and they do.Only about 15 percent of PR companies have the word “public relations” or “PR” in the name of the business, which makes it confusing to come up with one solid definition when there are so many roles in the feild.

The second reason from PRSA, “You can’t stand lingo or jargon.” After results came in from a crowd-sourced approach, it seemed as if too many disliked words were found to describe the profession, such as “public”, or “audiences.” People complain about the PR field having lingo, yet the appropriate term “stakeholders” probably wouldn’t want to be used etiher.

The third reason from PRSA, “They won’t change the profession’s image.” PRSA has many improvements to look forward to, such as creating a more diverse field or work, coming up with new measurement and evaluation techniques, and so many more.

The fourth reason from the PRSA, “They aren’t particulary modernized.” Out of the many definitions that were introduced, the final three that have been selected as options, are all principles that were used by 2 of the most sought after men in the field of PR, Barnum and Bernays.

Two out of the three final definitions are-

“Public relations is the management function that establishes and maintains mutually beneficial relationships between an organization and the publics on whom its success or failure depends.”

-Scott Cutlip, Allen Center, and Glen Broom ; “Effective Public Relations”

 

“Public relations is the management of communication between an organization and its publics. Its purpose is to cultivate relationships among organizations and publics.” 

                -Dr. James E. Grunig

 

The thing that I found was the most intriguing was at the end of the article, in which the author David C. Rickey wrote, “Finally, let’s remember that we will be judged by our performance and our results, not by how we define ourselves.” I think Rickey is absolutely right, however, it seems like people need definitions for everything these days.

My thoughts on PRSA defends the candidate of “public relations”

The article, PRSA defends the candidate definitions of “public relations”, was an interesting one. When I think of how I would define the term “public relations”, a number of words pop up in my head. That being said, that is why this article was written; we have not come to a conclusion on a definition of the profession in which everyone agrees on in he last112 years. There are four reasons why:

 The first reason from the PRSA, “You hate them.” People usually have something negative to say about the modernized definitions PRSA has come up with, with responses like- they don’t, you did, you can, and they do.Only about 15 percent of PR companies have the word “public relations” or “PR” in the name of the business, which makes it confusing to come up with one solid definition when there are so many roles in the feild.

The second reason from PRSA, “You can’t stand lingo or jargon.” After results came in from a crowd-sourced approach, it seemed as if too many disliked words were found to describe the profession, such as “public”, or “audiences.” People complain about the PR field having lingo, yet the appropriate term “stakeholders” probably wouldn’t want to be used etiher.

The third reason from PRSA, “They won’t change the profession’s image.” PRSA has many improvements to look forward to, such as creating a more diverse field or work, coming up with new measurement and evaluation techniques, and so many more.

The fourth reason from the PRSA, “They aren’t particulary modernized.” Out of the many definitions that were introduced, the final three that have been selected as options, are all principles that were used by 2 of the most sought after men in the field of PR, Barnum and Bernays.

Two out of the three final definitions are-

“Public relations is the management function that establishes and maintains mutually beneficial relationships between an organization and the publics on whom its success or failure depends.”

-Scott Cutlip, Allen Center, and Glen Broom ; “Effective Public Relations”

 

“Public relations is the management of communication between an organization and its publics. Its purpose is to cultivate relationships among organizations and publics.” 

                -Dr. James E. Grunig

 

The thing that I found was the most intriguing was at the end of the article, in which the author David C. Rickey wrote, “Finally, let’s remember that we will be judged by our performance and our results, not by how we define ourselves.” I think Rickey is absolutely right, however, it seems like people need definitions for everything these days.